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Two Ragtag Warriors Are Derrick Rose’s Most Vocal Supporters

Gilbert Arenas and Joakim Noah have come to Derrick Rose’s defense while the NBA world chastises his long-term thinking.

Derrick Rose
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Not ten games into the 2014-15 NBA Season, Derrick Rose is already feeling the proverbial heat. Already chastised for being the victim of an unfortunate string of injuries, the dynamic point guard finds himself on the hot seat for matters a bit more under his control.

When speaking on the nature of his sitting out games this early in the year, instead of giving the traditional and all-too typical canned response, Rose forewent altruistic talk of being ready for the postseason with something more colorful. In its place, he had this to say:

“I’m thinking about long term. I’m thinking about after I’m done with basketball. Having graduations to go to, having meetings to go to, I don’t want to be in my meetings all sore or be at my son’s graduation all sore just because of something I did in the past. [I’m] just learning and being smart.”

Perhaps rightfully so, fans and – what a surprise – media pundits are now questioning the former MVP’s commitment to the game. From his confession, it would seem that Rose values his future business happenings and family more than he does the game that’s coddled both. As member of an unquestionable contender, it would seem that Rose isn’t the champ the people need. And so, has fallen out of favor faster than Donald Sterling.

But not everyone wants Derrick Rose’s head on a comment board spike.

Two ragtag warriors, one in Gilbert Arenas and the other in always candid Joakim Noah, are committed to the star when no one else seems to be.

Arenas took to Instagram to express his support (and concern) for the PG:

“If u cheered for this man when he won #MVP u need to scream louder now when he needs the support the most…the hardest thing is working UR ass off to keep gettn hurt,that shit is deflating to a man mental..u go home every night asking ur self will I ever play the game I love like I once did before…every NBA player remembers that first basket,how many of these #HOFers,retiree’s, remember that last shot.??most don’t Becuz they didn’t know that was the end…

#DROSE u have ur whole career to prove who u are..u missed 2 seasons now,take ur time this season,adjust ur body to the game again You can’t make up the last 2 years in 1 season…the kid I watched on the #USA team had the swagger of #MVP #DROSE,watch tapes on how you kill #opp right now ur battling #doubt…

#CHITRAINERS if u don’t control that kids engine he will keep gettn hurt #thegiftandthecurse he has a #LAMBOengine on spare tires…adjust his game until he has fully understand how to use the gift he has…I’ll fine him 5k every time he takes off for no reason..protect ur asset u will make the playoff with or without him so baby his game this season…#MVP don’t worry about if ur worth the money FUCK YES ur worth what someone pays u…#chitownstandforthisman”

Hashtag diarrhea and suspect grammar aside, Arenas pens a heartfelt message that is most definitely coming from a place of empathy. He, too, knows what mental toll debilitating injuries can take on a player’s game, one that categorically rises when the critics get louder than your inner drive.

Noah, for his part, has been less introspective and reserved. Saying:

“Every time something happens to him, people act like it’s the end of the world.  And that’s f—ing so lame to me. Relax. Like, OK, he’s coming back from two crazy surgeries. Obviously we’re being conservative with him, and when things aren’t going right, he’s got to listen to his body more than anybody. So everybody needs to chill the f— out. I mean, I’m sorry for cursing, but I’m really passionate. I don’t like to see him down. And he doesn’t say that he’s down, but I don’t like it when, like, people portray him and judge him. ‘Cause it’s not fair to him. It’s not.”

Neither men are wrong as it seems that Rose can’t get a fair shake no matter what he says, how well he plays, or how his body holds up on him. At this point, he might become a self-fulfilling prophecy as the public drives him to a point where he hurts himself proving that he can no longer be hurt.

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