XN Sports

Sports News, Stats, Opinion, Daily Fantasy advice and more.

Week 6 Fantasy Baseball Buys and Sells: George Springer, Alex Wood

Josh Collacchi

In addition to writing here at XNSports, my fantasy content can be seen at Pro Football Focus Fantasy, eDraft, and Project Roto. Member of the FSWA and the FWAA and can be reached on Twitter @JoshCollacchi
Alex Wood
Daniel Shirey-USA TODAY Sports

Trades can shake up a fantasy league. You may be able to land a big-time starting pitcher, or a top-tier first baseman. You may be able to trade a player who is struggling for a player off to a hot start. But, always remember to get good value. Buy low, and sell high.

Buying high and selling low are two things you want to avoid, even if you are in dire need. Be sure to check the waiver wire as well.

Each week, XN Sports will have a Buys and Sells column, describing a few players to go after, or to get rid of. We all know to buy low and sell high, but are there players that are worth buying high or selling low? Each week we’ll get into that, and explain why to buy or sell.

This week, however, there are two options to buy low on, and two options to sell high on. The time for risks is slowly closing, but the time for adding value never ends.

This week’s edition of Buys and Sells:

Buy Low

George Springer, Houston Astros

Springer was a hot add off the waiver wire when he was called up, but struggled out of the gate. He is a prime “buy low” candidate this week because some may be down on him due to his .224 batting average and just one stolen base with zero home runs. So, why buy him? Springer has a hit in seven straight games, and nine of his last ten. His potential to steal 30 bases and hit 30 home runs (in a full season) is still there, so adding Springer for cheap is an advised option.

Alex Wood, Atlanta Braves

Wood already has five losses. That is not what a fantasy player wants out of a starting pitcher. Why would you want to add a pitcher with five losses? Simple, a loss is a team statistic, and does not correspond to Wood’s performance so far this season. He has pitched very well so far, compiling 44 strikeouts in 45 innings while only walking nine batters. Wood has a good ERA of 3.00 and a solid WHIP of 1.18. In four of his losses, he has given up six runs. Total runs. Six runs allowed in 33 innings is spectacular, but Wood has not yielded a win in that stretch. Some players that have Wood will want to trade him for less than what he is worth because of those five losses. Take advantage of that.

Sell High

Francisco Rodriguez, Milwaukee Brewers

“K-Rod” had a fantastic month of April, saving 13 games and allowing zero runs. So far in May, he only has one save. Without question, Rodriguez has been the best reliever in fantasy baseball so far, and that is why you should sell high. Someone will want saves because they are struggling in that category, but think about this. A save is one category. A league mate will trade a good player (or two) for Rodriguez that will contribute in more than one category. If you can get a starting pitcher, he can earn you wins, strikeouts, ERA, and WHIP. If you can land a hitter, he can earn you batting average, home runs, runs scored, runs batted in, and stolen bases. Ask for a lot when it comes to Rodriguez, and deal him now before his value goes down.

Dee Gordon, Los Angeles Dodgers

Gordon leads the Major Leagues in stolen bases with 20, is hitting .341, and he has scored 19 runs. So far he is off to a scorching-hot start, and has incredibly high value. Someone in your league will see the high batting average and stolen bases and pay a premium for him. Keep in mind that Gordon has struggled with the bat during the last two seasons with just 91 hits in 397 at-bats. In addition, Gordon’s career on-base percentage is a pedestrian .313 which includes this season. Gordon is due for serious regression as his BABIP (batting average on balls in play) is a ridiculous .402. What does that mean? Over 40 percent of the balls put in play by Gordon results in a hit. His career BABIP is .324, and that includes his minor league statistics. Trade Gordon while his value is sky-high and reap the benefits when his average drops below .280 by the All-Star break.